What leaders need, to achieve initial buy-in

transcript written by Wayne Brown

Highly effective presentations for every leader”

  • Video 1.01 – Preparing to present like a Pro
  • Video 1.02 – What leaders need, to achieve initial buy-in
  • Video 1.03 – Leaders that chunk, link, recall and review, win
  • Video 1.04 – Leaders need to learn how to close

Welcome back to “Highly effective presentations for every leader” – have you already complete episode # 1.01 – Preparing to present like a pro? 

As this is a series of 4 episodes, it will make it much easier to watch them in sequence. However, don’t despair; if time is short (and isn’t for everyone), we will start here with a summary of episode 1.01. 

So, it seems you’re about to get started with episode 1.02. 

Here we identify what leaders need to do during the crucial opening moments. 

In the final two episodes, 1.03 & 1.04, titled “Leaders that chunk, link, recall, and review, win” and “Leaders need to learn how to close,” respectively, we’ll investigate how to structure great presentations and then the methods for closing on a high.

5 key considerations from the previous episode – “Preparing to present like a Pro.”           

  • # 1: Know your audience
  • # 2: Structure your presentation
  • # 3: Create great visuals
  • # 4: Powerful questions & engaging activities
  • # 5: Prepare through practice

From episode 1.01 – Preparing to present like a Pro, we covered these 5 key considerations.

– and said to remember that preparation helps you to stay Participant Centred throughout the presentation. 

Let’s quickly recap on what we have covered so far.

#1 Know your audience 

  • meaning know who will be participating and how experienced they are on the subject 

#2 Structure your presentation 

  • by this, we mean actively chunk topics and create links or bridges between these topics, using the rule of 3 and incorporate stories.

#3 Create great visuals 

  • – remember simple is best, so they are easy to read and understand. 65% of adults have a visual learning preference. 

#4 Prepare powerful questions and engaging activities 

  • do some research on questioning techniques such as “funneling and develop simple activities.

#5 Prepare through practice 

  • experts say there are typically 3 presentation versions for every eventual delivery – Each individual needs to develop their own method which works best for them.

7 concepts of memory (listed in order of importance)

Primacy, Recency, chunking, linking, record & recall, review & revisit and outstandingness. 

# 1 in order of importance is Primacy – covered in this episode

# 2 in order of importance is Recency – covered in episode 1.04

# 3, 4, 5, 6 & 7 – covered in episodes 1.03 & 1.04.

Before jumping into episode 1.02, we would like to give you a short intro to the 7 concepts of memory (listed here in order of importance) – Primacy, Recency, Chunking, Linking, Record & Recall, Review & Revisit, and Outstandingness.

As stated, # 1 is Primacy – i.e., the thing our participants remember the most from your presentation is the opening (particularly if it stinks).

The second most important is how you close – i.e., Recency

– the last things we hear, do, or say before completing the presentation 

– we address this item in episode 4 of this series.

Whilst #’s 3, 4, 5, 6 & 7 (the remaining 5 concepts) we’ll cover in episodes 3 & 4.

So, it’s clearly important if we want people to retain the experience and learnings from our presentation that we turn our focus to these 7 concepts in the remaining 3 episodes.

Let’s now begin with episode 1.02.

Episode 1.02: What leaders need to achieve initial buy-in.”

Starting now with the 3 vital considerations specific to our second episode – “What leaders need, to achieve initial buy-in.”

– 1st captivate “From the very beginning.” 

– 2nd nailing those “opening comments.” 

– 3rd “Engage through Story.” 

Consideration # 1:            From the very beginning 

  • Dress to impress 
  • Communicate through body language 
  • Standstill – don’t rock or prowl

Consideration # 1:            First impressions are critical, so fromthe very moment you appear, the clock is running, and your audience is making their judgment about you and the likely presentation.

Therefore, make your actions and expressions purposeful 

  • approach the podium confidently, 
  • pause in silence, 
  • scan the room, 
  • raise your eyebrow 
  • and smile. 

People connect more with the top half of your face than the bottom, hence the eyebrow movement but smiling is infectious, so don’t miss it.  

Dress to impress – meaning neatly, regardless of dress code 

– if it’s stated that the dress code is smart casual on the smart side. If more formal, make sure you are clear on the requirements – NEVER underdress.

Use of body language for successful engagement 

> 50% of your communication occurs through your body language. 

  • Standstill – don’t prowl excessively – in the beginning, move more from the hips and plant your feet. 
  • Avoid rocking backward or forward or swaying. 
  • Keep hands visible in front of you. Use them to emphasize a point but don’t become the flag bearer waving wildly.

Consideration # 2:            Opening comments 

  • Remember the “WHY”   
  • Remember the “HOW” 
  • Voice control 
  • Graphic visual image

Consideration # 2:            Opening comments 

– use a powerful intro to give the subject substance & connect to the audience 

When we say “Remember the WHY,” – consider that we are all presenters at some stage in our career. 

The audience is there because they are wanting to hear and learn something new. Ensure your opening confirms their trust in you and reason for listening. 

“Remember the HOW” – by demonstrating through words your Honesty, Authenticity, Integrity, Love – or HAIL, as Julian Treasure refers to it in his 2013 TED Talk on “How to speak so that people want to listen.” 

Julian further defines HAIL “as to greet or acclaim enthusiastically.”

Additionally, lock the audience into you with your voice control 

  • don’t speak too fast or too speedily, 
  • ensure the right tone, 
  • volume and pitch. 

If you have a voice like me, use aids to assist you.

Introduce the subject using words that paint a graphic, visual image. 

  • Explore and express the subject in a way that the audience will connect with. 

Consideration # 3:            Engage through Story 

  • Use stories to link yourself
  • Be relatable
  • And have fun!

Consideration # 3:            Engage through Story 

  • and understand the difference between telling me and showing me a story. 

Learning to become a storyteller is one of your most powerful aids as a presenter. 

Discover how to unpack a story by taking the time to detail and explore details and living each moment.     

Where possible, link yourself into the subject through this story as a means of self-introduction and introducing your background.

Be careful to stay relatable – authentic by being yourself, relaxed, engaging, enthusiastic. If the story is too unbelievable, then more likely that it won’t be.

And finally, remember to have fun 

  • enjoy the moment regardless of whether the topic is serious and dry or humorous and comical.

Consolidation of the 3 key considerations

  • # 1 From the very beginning 
  • # 2 Opening comments
  • # 3 Engage through Story

So that covers the 3 key considerations in this episode # 2.  What leaders need to  achieve initial buy-in.”

Remember that the opening seconds/minutes set the scene for the success of your presentation. In this episode, the 3 key considerations we spoke about were.  

# 1 From the very beginning – we need to approach the podium confidently, pause in silence, scanning the room, raise our eyebrows, pause again, and then smile.

# 2 Opening comments – use a powerful intro to give the subject substance & connect to the audience. Paint a graphic picture through your words.

# 3 Engage through story – and understand the difference between a “telling me & showing me” story.

Thank you for listening to this 2nd episode called “What leaders need, to achieve initial buy-in,” from our series “Highly effective presentations for every leader.” 

We look forward to you joining us as we continue our journey with episode #3 called Leaders that chunk, link, recall, and review, win”!

Leaders need to learn how to close

transcript written by Wayne Brown

Highly effective presentations for every leader”

  • Video 1 – Preparing to present like a Pro
  • Video 2 – What leaders need, to achieve initial buy-in
  • Video 3 – Leaders that chunk, link, recall and review, win
  • Video 4 – Leaders need to learn how to close

Welcome back to “Highly effective presentations for every leader” – you have reached the final episode of this series. And before moving onto our new material from episode #1.04, it’s important to recap what we’ve covered so far.

In episode # 1.01 – Preparing to present like a pro, we started by looking at the necessary preparations to enable professional presentations. 

Episode # 1.02 – What leaders need to achieve initial buy-in, we reviewed the critical considerations for that opening stanza of the presentation. 

And the previous episode #1.03, called “Leaders that chunk, link, recall, and review, win,” we looked closely at the essentials for presenters during the body of the delivery – and we’ll now summarize this in more detail.

OK, so lets at the consolidation of the 5 key considerations from episode #1.03.

If you recall, this episode is related to the “body of the presentation,” We touch on the 4 of the 7 concepts for memory retention.  

# 1 The art of chunking & linking – adults digest information best when it is broken into small parcels

# 2 Using body language to enhance the message – focusing on your facial expression, hand gestures, and body movement

# 3 Using voice to enhance the message – just as body language conveys a visual message, your voice conveys the verbal & vocal message 

# 4 Recall through activities – active learning is a powerful mechanism for assisting adults in locking in the message

# 5 Revisit and review – will deepen learning retention and create the potential for behavior change

As we have covered all 7 concepts of memory, let’s review them again here first and in order of importance 

  • Primacy, 
  • Recency
  • Chunking, 
  • Linking, 
  • Record & recall, 
  • review & revisit 
  • and outstandingness.               

Do you recall this topic from episode 2, where we said Primacy was the most important concept for memory? 

Well, now we look at the second most important “Recency,”meaning the last things we do before finishing our presentation – our close.

This is your final opportunity to ensure that all of the key points the audience has received and discussed are taken away with them in their minds and perhaps their hands. 

Let us now move into today’s topic.

During the next few minutes, we will explore the final 3 considerations in this 4th and final episode of the series – “Leaders need to learn how to close.”

  • Starting with “Summarizing topics & key take-aways.”
  • Followed by “Concluding the presentation.”

And finishing off with a Call to action     

Are you ready, then let’s start!

Consideration # 1:            Summarizing the topics and key take-aways 

  • this is where you bring it all together that one last time. 

Do you remember we spoke about the importance of reviewing a minimum of 6 times in the previous episode?                       

  • State the topics you have covered and those key points from each – recall something specific that was discussed with these points, so participants can recall.
  • Make the points visual so that there is a final chance to digest and retain – show graphically the link between all the topics which lead to the conclusion.
  • Take final questions and try to seek the audience’s involvement to review if your forum allows.

Consideration #2:              Concluding the presentation 

this is your chance to finish on a high!      

It is a great opportunity to practice your outstandingness – put on your dancing shoes (figuratively speaking) and make it special.

Leave the audience with something to remember the subject by – such as a closing statement quoted by someone famous or a dire prediction if no change follows.

During your preparations, you would have identified this, and now it’s time to live it and illustrate the lasting image you want the group to leave with – make it big and bold on and off the screen.

Consideration # 3:            Calling to action 

  • all great presentations have a follow-up request or requirement     

Try using the “challenge” or “call back” close – pose something which will require the audience to act immediately or commit to a post-workshop event.

Providing handouts, notes, or information on future events for the audience to take if interested is a good idea – but again create a reason why people would want to open it after they leave. 

I’ve been to way too many events where I have been given material that sits on my desk for a while when I get back to the office but eventually ends up on my shelf or in the bin.  

Don’t drag the ending on too long – bring the presentation to a close. 

If possible, stay for the remainder of proceeding to field questions outside of the event. 

To summarize episode # 1.04 and consolidate the 3 key considerations –  we’ve just learned how to effectively close a presentation.            

Start by Summarizing the topics and key take-aways – this is where you bring it all together.

Then conclude the presentation – your chance to finish on a high – Leave the audience with something to remember the subject by – such as a closing statement quoted by someone famous.

And finally, and very importantly, create a Call to action – all great presentations have a follow-up request for some form of immediate action or commit to a post-workshop event.

So that’s it for this episode. Thank you for listening to this series, “Highly effective presentations for every leader.” 

We’ve enjoyed making this short series 12 months back and are happy now that we have them available as a podcast series. We hope you can get value from the discussion and strengthen your presentation ability. 

It’s truly a key skill for all executives. During the series, we have covered  4 topics; 

– Preparing to present like a Pro

– What leaders need to achieve initial buy-in

– Leaders that chunk, link, recall, and review, win

– Leaders need to learn how to close

Please visit our site @ A Mentors Couch.com and subscribe to this channel called couchTALK, on Stitcher and Apple. Plus, if you haven’t already done so, you can watch this series as a video through our YouTube channel Mentors Rant.

We’re presently working on a series of meditation tracks for use during my coaching sessions. After that, we’ll be ready to start moving onto the Leaders Advance series available through our 3 pack approach – video, podcast, and blog.

So until the next release, bye for now, and enjoy presenting!

Leaders that chunk, link, recall and review

transcript written by Wayne Brown

Highly effective presentations for every leader”

  • Video 1.01 – Preparing to present like a Pro
  • Video 1.02 – What leaders need, to achieve initial buy-in
  • Video 1.03 – Leaders that chunk, link, recall and review, win
  • Video 1.04 – Leaders need to learn how to close

Welcome back to “Highly effective presentations for every leader” – in episode 1.01, we started by looking at the necessary preparations to enable professional presentations. 

Episode 1.02 followed with a detailed review of the critical considerations for that opening stanza of the presentation. 

And now you’ve reached episode 1.03 in this 4 part series, where we discuss how to enable better knowledge retention and the likelihood of behavioral change, based on the presenters’ ability to keep the new information in bite-size nuggets or parcels – we call them chunks – which are well structured and with a clear link from one chunk to the next. 

Before starting off on this new material, however, let’s go back and briefly summarize the 3 key considerations from previous episode 1.02 – “What leaders need, to achieve initial buy-in.”

3 key considerations from that episode

  • # 1: Captivate from the very beginning
  • # 2: Opening comments
  • # 3: Engage through Story

Before starting off on this new material, however, let’s go back and briefly summarize the 3 key considerations from previous episode 1.02 – “What leaders need, to achieve initial buy-in.”

We highlighted the fact that first impressions are lasting, and therefore our # 1 consideration begins the moment you step up in front of the audience and before opening your mouth 

  • approach the podium, 
  • pause in silence, 
  • scan the room, 
  • raise your eyebrows, 
  • pause again and then smile.

Then we move to those opening comments

  • look at how your opening can be powerful, 
  • naturally connected to the subject & 
  • hooking the audience 

And finally, we suggest you engage through a story. 

  • But important to become effective at delivering stories.

Understand the difference between telling me and showing me the story through a descriptive well thought through & emotive storyline.

In this episode 1.03 – “Leaders that chunk, link, recall, and review, win,” we will cover 5 specific considerations.

1st – The art of chunking & linking, 

2nd – Body language to enhance the message, 

3RD – Using voice to enhance the message, 

4TH – Recall through activities 

5TH – and finally Revisit and Review   

Are you ready? Then let’s get started!

Consideration # 1:              The art of chunking and linking – adults digest information best when broken into small parcels of sequential data in a logically structured way.

Start by raising the audience interest in a new topic 

  • use your visual tools to outline something memorable and perhaps even abstract to get their attention. 

See whether the participants can determine what you are showing or illustrating. Word of warning, however, must be related or connected to the topic your introducing.

Chunk the topic info by spending no more than 15-20 mins discussing the topic items – this timeframe allows people to remain focused and digest the new information. 

Anything longer and studies have shown that the human absorption rate drops off quite sharply.

Link the topic items and subsequent topics so that there is a clear structure between points 

  • where possible find ways to link the information to the audience’s workplace. 
    • This will help with the “Participant Centredness.”

Consideration # 2:              Using Body language to enhance the message. 

Focus on facial expression, hand gestures, and body movement to greatly enhance engagement with the audience.          

Leverage your face to highlight key points – people engage best when the presenter uses the upper half of the face – i.e., eyes and forehead, rather than only the mouth. 

Eye contact is essential with each participant but makes your scanning natural rather than a continuous radar.

Hand gestures are powerful when used as an invite – extended arm and open palm to the audience, equally so when wanting to reinforce a point by using the steeple hands to question or reflect. 

Avoid placing your hands behind your back and in pockets – this appears if you have something to hide. 

Walking towards the audience helps emphasize the importance of a point, and moving backward brings closure to that discussion or point. 

Avoid rocking in one place or prowling around the floor. 

As a guide – move, then pause, make your point, and then move again.

Consideration # 3:              Using voice to enhance the message 

  • – just as your body language conveys a visual message, your voice tells the verbal & vocal message

Terms such as “Register, timbre, prosody, pace, pitch & volume” are as many key attributes for presenters as they are for singers.

  • Your ability to control and utilize your voice to emphasize a point is a critical tool and should be practiced. 

At all costs, avoid the monotone dialogue. 

Utilize the PAUSE and SILENCE methods to create effect and emphasize key points – an interesting practice is to use pause and get the audience to complete sentences to create engagement. 

Brian Tracy, one of the business success gurus, illustrates this nicely in several of his videos.  

A final suggestion here is to make the microphone your best friend but don’t make love to the microphone. 

If you have a large gathering, use a microphone to ensure your voice carries 

  • Practice using the microphone in advance so that you are aware of how it sounds. 

However, avoid playing with it or making it a distraction during your presentation.

Consideration # 4:              Recall through activities 

  • active learning is powerful, and research confirms that it’s the best way to help adults remember (i.e., learning through experience).     

Plan short activities to reinforce the theory of the topics – no more than 5-10 mins is required after each subject, but this depends on the type of workshop you are presenting.  

Additionally, incorporate simple reinforcement exercises through discussion, questions, brainstorming will help participants digest and recall.

Ensure your activities relate to the topic and enable the audience to easily link the theory with the experience. 

A good practice is to ask the audience to visualize how they could use this knowledge or skills at a later stage back in their workplace. 

By doing this, you transfer the learning and experience across to implementation – forming a very powerful and lasting connection.

Consideration # 5:              Revisit and review 

  • if this part is utilized correctly, it will deepen learning retention and increase the potential for behavior change.   

There are three main stages to your presentation – the opening, the body, and the close. 

  • At the open, you tell them what you are going to say to them
  • during the body, you tell them what you need to tell them
  • and in closing, you tell them what you have already told them.

Studies show that it’s necessary to revise each topic 6 – 7 times to maximize the potential for later recall – each way should be a little different from the previous. 

This can be achieved informally through simple discussion, question/ answer, summarizing, even with hands-on activities, or in a more formal manner where participants are asked to complete a written test. 

Whichever combination you choose, seek out as many opportunities as possible to repeatedly review the topic you have introduced.  

One effective way we have already mentioned earlier is to conclude the topic with an example and illustrate that example via a “show me” story.

We’ve covered a lot of territory in this episode, so let’s recap and summarize the 5 key considerations; 

During the body of any presentation, we touch on 4 of the 7 concepts for memory retention.

# 1 The art of chunking & linking – adults digest information best when it is broken into small parcels

# 2 Using body language to enhance the message – focusing on your facial expression, hand gestures, and body movement

# 3 Using voice to enhance the message – just as body language conveys a visual message, your voice conveys the verbal & vocal message 

# 4 Recall through activities – active learning is a powerful mechanism for assisting adults in locking in the message

# 5 Revisit and review – will deepen learning retention and create the potential for behavior change

Thank you for listening to this third episode, Leaders that chunk, link, recall, and review, win,” from our series “Highly effective presentations for every leader.” 

One episode remaining in this series called “Leaders need to learn how to close.” 

Looking forward to seeing you soon, be sure to preparation, open with purpose, and practice chunking and linking.

Bye for now.